Emotional About Environmentalism

Radiohead released the video for “House of Cards” early Monday morning. The video is not just a continuation of the band’s subvert-the-norm conceptualization through the use of the internet; it’s also a promotion of their inclinations towards positively affecting the environment. The video was filmed without the use of cameras as the band opted to use 3D plotting technologies to create the on-screen narrative.

Of course, you could read pretty deep into the visual concept of the video. Is the destruction of power-lines (outlined in red) meant to symbolize a sense of negativity directed at our society’s drain on the amount of available energy? Maybe yes, maybe no, but beyond the message of the “House of Cards” video and the method Radiohead chose to create it, the band has been a forward-thinking unit on the subject of the environment. As the world’s “biggest” musical acts were chastised for traveling to their various Live Earth performances last year, Radiohead were nowhere to be seen. Instead of joining in on critiquing their peers on environmental protection, Radiohead have taken the higher and independent road towards helping the environment. Using their status as one of the biggest acts in the world, they’ve done everything from getting fans to calculate their carbon footprint, to their green-friendly performance on Late Night with Conan O’Brien, to providing a major chunk of live material (in the guise of a performance by Jonny Greenwood and Thom Yorke) on the Artists Taking Action On Climate Change compilation. Cynics can call it a gimmick, but Radiohead have used their position in pop culture for an excellent cause.

Although certainly not as well known as Radiohead, emo act Get Cape. Wear Cape. Fly has been a force in environmental action in their native UK. Or should I say “his” native UK. GCWCF was created by Sam Duckworth, and the rest of the band has offered more of a stage-presence than a recorded or creative force. Combining lo-fi indie and folk with the vocal stylings of third-wave emo (think acoustic Taking Back Sunday with even less screaming) and Dashboard Confessional-type acoustic underpinnings.

Sam Duckworth

Sam Duckworth

Although GCWCF may seem something not-out-of-the-ordinary to American listeners, his actions as a musician are certainly admirable. Duckworth is an ardent supporter and champion of everything from Free Trade to Love Music Hate Racism – an activist group aiming at subverting the acts of UK racist organizations. Perhaps it’s unsurprising then that Duckworth would be an ardent supporter of positive environmental action; he’s done everything from DJing the World Environment Day Trust concert in London to conducting television and magazine interviews concerning environmental protection and green-friendly touring.

Sure, it may be a far cry from seeing numerous bands make albums filled with their own versions of “Burning Too” – the environmentally conscience song off of Fugazi’s 13 Songs. But, as Fugazi have been heralded for sticking their positive and political beliefs, it’s important to recognize the actions that acts take in order to ensure that they’re up to snuff with their ideals. He may not be at Radiohead’s level, but Sam Duckworth and Get Cape. Wear Cape. Fly certainly make their ideas an important part of their image. And in the world of emo, where image has come to be more important in the eyes of the media and mainstream, there’s nothing wrong with a little positive change.

Get Cape. Wear Cape. Fly – Waiting For The Monster To Drown (free download)

GCWCF – War of the Worlds (live, BBC 1):

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