Tag Archives: Great Scott

forget the blog, shows

Another day, another forgetters/Blake Schwarzenbach post.

Now, the band has a blog. Does this make it official?

Well, it sure is nice of them to post some show info… and the band is hitting up some places that Thorns of Life overlooked… including Boston!

Here are the dates, with more info on the blog:

9/18: NYC (Lit Lounge)

9/25: Philly (The Barbary)

10/2: Providence (AS220)

10/4: Boston (Great Scott)

Also, it looks like the rumor of Against Me’s Kevin Mahon in the drummer spot is true. And the bass player is Caroline Paquita, an artist extraordinare living in Brooklyn.

Aaaand the band has an email too, though I won’t post it here: check out their blogger profile.

What’s next? An album? A national tour? forgetters Rock Band? All of the above?!?!?!

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East of Vancouver

 

Japandroids

Japandroids

Check out Bostonist today for a review of the Japandroids Great Scott gig from Sunday night. Twas an entertaining, endearing, and solid set that kept me going from 11:30 until one am on little sleep and having arrived much much earlier that day by plane.

But, enough of that… read on if you’re interested, and check out Post-Nothing if you like to shake your fists a lot. And I mean a lot.

Sonic Bites

Guitars

Guitars

Check out my review of Cymbals Eat Guitars at Great Scott on Bostonist tomorrow/today. As a brief aside, Joe (the singer) has a singing style not unlike many frontman from many a mid-90s emo band. I’ll leave it at that. Stumble your way onto Bostonist tomorrow if you’re more interested in the band…

Cave In Reunion Show

That’s right! The Massachusetts post-hardcore metal maelstrom known as Cave In is doing a reunion show. So far, it looks like it’s just one show, at Great Scott in Boston. Tickets went on sale this morning at 10 am and sold out.

I’m currently trying to grab frontman Steve Brodsky for an interview for Bostonist. I put on a show with Steve and folkie Elijah Wyman last year at Brandeis, and it was quite a combo. Steve’s a wonderful songwriter and an excellent performer, and a nice and friendly guy to boot.

And as for Cave In? I was lucky enough to catch them before their current hiatus a handful of years ago, in Newbury Comics of all places! Though I wasn’t as familiar with their discography as I am now, it proved to be one of the best sets of that summer, and I can still distinctly remember the set being so loud that some of the merch fell down and hit one of the guys (Adam I think) partway through the set. I hope there are a handful of tickets leftover that I can grab!

Hilarious interview from years ago:

PS: Here’s what the band had to say on their myspace, a brief announcement concerning the reunion just two days ago

“Dear friends,

 

After 3 1/2 long years, Cave In has decided to end its hiatus. Please

join us for an EP release show at Great Scott’s (1222 Commonwealth

Ave., Allston MA) on Sunday, July 19th @ 9PM. Also playing will be our

friends Disappearer and Phantom Glue. Copies of the “Planets Of Old”

limited 12″ (recorded by Adam Taylor, Alex Hartman & Johnny Northrup @

Camp St. Studio) from Hydra Head Records will be available that night.

 

We hope to see your lovely selves.

 

Steve, Adam, J.R., Caleb

CAVE IN”

Man, talk about a viral response – those tickets went quick!

Sunny Day Real Estate Reunion in 2009?

 

I hope this is real...

I hope this is real...

Twitter is beginning to become really beneficial… the news that Sunny Day Real Estate may be reuniting for a second time is literally music to my ears… History and influence aside, the ability to see Sunny Day on stage today would be a momentous occasion for those who still consider emo to be a viable genre. Considering the numerous groups that have been reuniting en mass lately, this would be a pleasant surprise.

This announcement, or Twitter-based, pre-potential-announcement leak from Brian Perkins, may explain why, just a handful of months ago, Sunny Day frontman Jeremy Enigk refused to perform any of the band’s material during a solo set at Great Scott. “I cannot play any of those songs without the rest of the band” was what Enigk announced after a flurry of calls to perform SDRE tracks. Considering he’d been known to perform the average Sunny Day song solo lately, and considering this little bit o’ news that’s come to fruition, I guess it does make sense that Enigk would refuse to perform any material from SDRE as they may be reuniting once again.

Fingers crossed…

In other Sunny Day news, Jeremy Enigk will be releasing his newest solo album, OK Bear, on May 12th. Pitchfork has the album’s single, “Mind Idea” available for download. Fans of Enigk’s Return of the Frog Queen should be satiated with this song, as it’s lo-fi quality and focus on darker musical tones is more reminiscent of Enigk’s older material than the musician’s slicker sophomore release, World Waits

Jeremy Enigk – \”Mind Idea\”

Double Double

In one corner, weighing in at 6 members is The Mae Shi, with support from The Death Set, at Great Scott.

The Mae Shi live

The Mae Shi live

In the other, pulling together as a duo is No Age, with a little help from High Places and Abe Vigoda, at the Middle East Downstairs.

No Age

No Age

It is a challenge to behold… For music fans of Boston, tonight’s concert calendar will have a tough choice, but either event will provide a winner. This may be a match for an individual’s night, but it is no way a battle between acts. This cavalcade of musicians rolling through town represents some of the brightest acts from the three pivotal underground music communities today.

The Mae Shi, No Age, and Abe Vigoda mastered their craft and honed in on their acts out in LA. There, they (along with a multitude of other acts) formed a community dedicated to furthering the boundaries of art and punk. It’s a living, breathing unit that can be seen in the 40 Bands 80 Minutes documentary (it is what it says – 40 bands performing 2 minute songs in a sweaty LA venue) or on any regular evening at The Smell, the all ages venue that No Age placed smack dab on the cover of their 2007 album Weirdo Rippers. With the critical acclaim these three acts – alongside peers such as HEALTH and Mika Miko – have been receiving, the LA underground scene has once again been thrown into the national music limelight.

The Smell

The Smell

Although LA has received a considerable amount of attention, so has Brooklyn (home of High Places) and, more than any other area, Baltimore (home of The Death Set). Forever cast in the shadows of nearby, larger areas (Baltimore has DC, and although Brooklyn is a part of NYC, Manhattan has always dominated the other burroughs), these tiny, seemingly-culturally deprived areas have burst with creative ingenuity in all forms of the arts. Baltimore has built an insular community to match its small sized, and has since been propelled to the national level thanks in part to the Wham City collective and its unofficial head Dan Deacon; in little pockets of a city that most residents have either forgotten or never cared about, out came a sprawling arts basin that seems as communally inbred as it is creative. Venture north a number of hours and you hit Brooklyn, itself a sprawling mass of space that’s cheaper – and therefore, more attractive to aspiring artists looking to make it in the big city. Any busted-up storefront could easily be turned into an art gallery or performance space, and a good number of them art (at least in the Williamsburg area). Out of it has formed numerous art-punk acts as wide spread, yet communally linked; TV On The Radio, Battles, Parts & Labor, and a ton of others all call this place home.

Baltimores Video Hippos at Brooklyns Death by Audio

Baltimore's Video Hippos at Brooklyn's Death by Audio

Both Baltimore and Brooklyn offer scenes that are in close proximity to areas of cultural resonance, but their chance location has given both places an almost-secluded quality which has allowed these communities to prosper and trade ideas amongst one another without the eye of the mainstream music world staring down upon them. LA, though a mainstream cultural capital in its own respect, is so spread out that over the past few decades, it has allowed for numerous musically-based culture movements to spawn and spread out of little pockets in the vast city side and across the suburban sprawl. These communities are created and developed in the guise of complete creativity, without the influence and impact of commercial interest to hinder, attract, or distract anything or anyone from the ultimate goal of creation. These qualities are the typical stamp-of-approval for the development of underground art communities in the US; the resources are there in almost every location in America, but it takes a special formula of location, individuals, and atmosphere to make it work.

This is an important aspect of the development and continued thriving of emo as an underground cultural force. It’s still one that drives the many different voices of emo in its current underground status. True, emo has become a fashionable commodity, but it doesn’t mean that it hasn’t continued to thrive as an underground culture, one separate from its mainstream state. It’s the ideas of creativity and independence that the innovators of the culture imbued into its artistic essence that not only kept emo in the underground for so long (around 15-17 years, depending on when you choose to mark its beginning and entrance into the mainstream). When what became known as “emo” began in the ashes of DC’s hardcore scene, a good chunk of the punk music community scorned it as hardcore had yet to hit its dramatic fall on the national level. DC was (and in many ways, still is) ignored by the music industry as an important place, so emo transformed, unfettered by outsiders and made for the better by community members. As Fugazi became the scene’s main touring act and magnet, their sound became a beacon to anyone looking beyond the convention of punk and broadcast a vibrant and diverse aural image of emo around the world.

Fugazi

Fugazi

From there, communities outside of the insular DC scene began to form around the idea of emo. The strongest cross-state emo community to arise didn’t occur until the mid 90s. While connections formed among artists from different scenes (Sunny Day Real Estate and Shudder To Think as touring partners comes to mind), the mid 90s provided a time when scenes across the country formed their own little pockets and ideas of emo, yet would come together to share them. Outside of DC (which added Chisel and The Dismemberment Plan to their list), the East Coast had pockets of sound; NYC had Texas Is The Reason, New Jersey had Lifetime, Boston had Karate and Jejune (who later moved to California), and down in Florida (if you want to count it as the East Coast) there was Hot Water Music.

Mineral

Mineral

But the mid 90s and emo will forever be associated with the Mid-West, where the bands were as connected to their hometown scenes as they were with the rest of the middle-country-divide. Cap’n Jazz, The Promise Ring, Jimmy Eat World, Mineral, Christie Front Drive, Braid, The Get Up Kids, Boy’s Life, and dozens more upon hundreds of those which may never be heard by the masses have formed a dominant portrait of a land and time in the emo narrative. The places they came from are all different and so are their ideas, but they all came together to form a variety of sounds that continue to exist within popularized forms of emo today. Consider it the time of multiculturalism in underground American punk. While the national hardcore scene transformed local sounds into one big rule-based notion of musical defiance summarized in a minute and a half of screams and thrashing guitars, the mid 90s Mid-West emo scene allowed for individual pockets to develop their version of emo undeterred by outsiders all while coming together to form bonds and trade ideas to enhance their individual perspectives. This can be seen in everything from split singles on vinyl (such as the Jimmy Eat World/Christie Front Drive split that attracted the attention of Captiol Records) to a shared creation of lyrics (The Promise Ring’s “Picture Postcard” attributes some lyrical content to Braid’s Bob Nanna), to simple ties of friendship that extend past inter-state routes. Just as the movers and shakers of today’s underground music scenes breach state lines to form communities while continuing to build their local ones, emo became a strong presence throughout America before it became a mainstream phenomenon. Those connections kept it a living, moving center of a community, and that notion continues to drive like-minded individuals who operate under whatever label they choose to this very day.
No Age – Eraser

The Mae Shi – Vampire Beats (video):